THE EARREGULARS

THE EARREGULARS

The EarRegulars feature leader Jon-Erik Kellso on trumpet and Matt Munisteri on guitar and feature guest artists every week. The play swinging, melodic classic jazz, i.e. everything from New Orleans style through the tin pan alley classics, the swing era, and mainstream jazz.

They don't play half hour long solos, although it's not unusual for a song to last 10 minutes or more; they like to take our time and enjoy exploring ensemble improv', a conversational style. They approach traditional jazz in an open-minded, in-the-moment way.

This band often smiles and laughs (yes--even on stage!), and is not ashamed of this.

Eve Silber and Chris Hemingway

Eve Silber and Chris Hemingway

A long time resident of the West Village Eve received much of her training in the Village, under the tutelage of guitar great Dave Van Ronk, as well as in the accompaniment of the great dames of Grove Street: Marie Blake, and Mable Godwin. She carries out her love affair with the American Songbook in a swinging fashion, and with the traditional joy of the traditional jazz era.

Eve released an album of oringal songs ("In My Life and Times") derived and dedicated to her studies with Dave Van Ronk. Continuing her guitar training with virtuosos Frank Christian and Roni Ben Hur, . More recently she released "Wasn't There A Dream", an album of original and standard jazz tunes.

A jazz singer, guitarist and songwriter Eve Silber performs a repertoire of standards and substandards regularly in and around New York City, including New York City's oldest jazz club.

Eve extends her music to good causes, eager students, and appreciative audiences.

Mule bone

Mule bone

Mulebone is virtuosic multi-instrumentalist John Ragusa and New York Blues Hall of Fame inductee Hugh Pool. The launching pad for their musical expression is traditional blues played with guts, technique and a without-a-net sense of adventure. The word is transcendent.

W.C.Handy winning author Don Wilcox wrote, "Mulebone takes old blues and folk music into space as well as anyone since Led Zeppelin covered Sonny Boy Williamson.”

Hugh Pool plays the National Steel, electric, cigar box and acoustic guitars, harmonica, stomps on a boot-board, and sings lead vocals all with a mouth full of whiskey and a giant heart. John Ragusa plays all manner of flutes, fifes and tin whistles, the cornet, conch shell, jews harp, and well…anything he can put his lips on. He also sings harmony vocals, perfectly complimenting Pool's. The result is a sum greater than the parts; more sound, texture and groove than 2 people should be legally allowed to make.